Archive

Day: 26 July 2020

5 posts

Dear fellow knitters – a letter on cannabis legislation

Dear fellow knitters – a letter on cannabis legislation

Dear fellow knitters,

I’m sorry I couldn’t join the club meeting on Tuesday – my arthritis was playing up again.

Which leads me to my real reason for writing. I’ve felt a little shy about it. I want to talk about the cannabis referendum but it’s not the easiest thing to talk about without a few raised eyebrows and dropped stitches.

I read recently that most people our age are voting no in the referendum, even though 70+ are the largest voting group (go us!). It broke my heart. I use cannabis to help with my arthritis. A little on rainy or cold days when it’s worst takes the pain right away and I can keep my knitting on track too.

I have been offered other medication from doctors but at this stage, I just don’t want to be taking more harsh pills than I have to. I know a lot of people think that cannabis is just used by some rascal youths – but the truth is there are quite a few of us in this age group who find it helpful.

I don’t feel safe buying it from a dealer so my son has been helping me – but the idea that he could end up in prison for this has me very worried. Imagine if he got caught and it was because of me!

I remember what our parents used to tell us about cannabis. It’s time we re-read the facts on this – not everything we were told is actually true! Times have changed and I know we aren’t a bunch of sticks in the mud.

The Bill sounds really reasonable and mostly makes accessing cannabis very restricted but safe and smart. I hope you might consider making it a yes for people like me – not a criminal, not a baddy. Just a granny with some achy joints! (no pun intended…ok maybe a little.)

Wishing you all the best,

Your friend and co-knitter

 

So long as you have prohibition, you can’t solve the problem – David Lange

So long as you have prohibition, you can’t solve the problem – David Lange

So long as you have prohibition, you can’t solve the problem.

 

Former Prime Minister David Lange revealed his support for marijuana legalisation in a 1993 interview with then-NORML News editor Nandor Tanczos.

“Climbing the Marijuana Mountain – NORML talks with David Lange”, was published in the Summer 1993 edition of NORML News magazine. We now present online many of David Lange’s best quotes from that issue, including:

“So long as you have prohibition, you can’t solve the problem.”

“So long as the production of it [cannabis], the growing, the selling, the distribution of it remains unlawful….it becomes, by reason of its illegality, a valuable substance, and there’s a lot at stake. And people therefore do things like kill for it – I mean that’s not an exaggeration, that’s the truth.”


“Any society which tolerates alcoholic consumption at the level at which we do and then prosecutes and punishes against cannabis has an extraordinary amount of self deception about it.” – David Lange New Zealand Prime Minister 1984-1989 and absolute legend.

Mother Aubert: The first person known to grow cannabis in NZ

Mother Aubert: The first person known to grow cannabis in NZ

Did you know?  Mother Aubert who started a home for the less fortunate in New Zealand was the first person to grow cannabis in Aotearoa to help heal her fellow kiwis.


Suzanne Aubert – better known as Mother Aubert, was a Catholic sister who started a home for orphans and the under-privileged in Jerusalem, New Zealand in 1885.  Aubert later started two hospitals in Wellington; the first, St Joseph’s Home for the Incurables in 1900, and Our Lady’s Home of Compassion in 1907.

Aubert devoted her life to helping others. Her work took her from France to Auckland then to Hawke’s Bay, to the Whanganui River and finally to Wellington. And along the way, she founded a new Catholic congregation, cared for children and the sick, by skilfully combining Māori medicine and Pākehā science, and wrote books in Māori, English and French adding significantly to a higher cultural understanding and literary heritage.

Much of the income of the order came through the sales of Aubert’s medicinal formulations, including many cannabis-based medicines – Aubert is the first person known to grow cannabis in New Zealand – The story of marijuana in New Zealand

On 1 October 1926, aged 91, Aubert died. New Zealand’s newspapers spread the word and crowds gathered to pay their last respects. Her funeral at the church of St Mary of the Angels was widely reported to be the largest funeral ever accorded a woman in New Zealand.

 

Ben Franks launches CBD product in UK

Ben Franks launches CBD product in UK

“I think everyone should have the option or the ability to be able to use these products…there are health benefits with CBD, which should be accessible to the public.” says the former All Black legend Ben Franks.

“Having it over-regulated, or having to go through a doctor to buy a food supplement, is over the top, considering all the other stuff you can get your hands on in a store.”

“A lot of the benefits come from the CBD part of it. So we’d like to see that become open to everyone in the public, and obviously the THC bit of it could be regulated the way you regulate alcohol and tobacco.”  Well said Ben.

Franks has recently launched impactsportscbd a health food supplement in the UK.  Unfortunately the product is banned in New Zealand under our current drug laws.  A Yes vote will ensure health supplements like impactsportscbd will be easier to get in New Zealand.

IMPACT Sports CBD combines a passion for sport and fitness with the unrivaled cannabis and CBD knowledge of CiiTECH Ltd.

Fact: Youth Cannabis use decreased after legislation in Canada

Fact: Youth Cannabis use decreased after legislation in Canada

MYTH: Cannabis use will increase if legalised.

TRUTH:  As we have seen in other countries that have legalised, cannabis use did not increase.

Canada has shown that youth use rates in fact decreased.  Between 2018 and 2019 cannabis use among 15- to 17-year-olds declined (19.8% to 10.4%).

The only increases were in first time users aged 45+ and a slight increase in 65+ immediately after legalisation.